“Dyers Eve – Erroneous Zones: Take it or Leave it”‏

“The highest form of ignorance is when you reject something you don’t know anything about” Wayne Dyer

“Love is the ability and willingness to allow those that you care for to be what they choose for themselves without any insistence that they satisfy you”. Wayne Dyer

Dear Mother
Dear Father
What is this hell you have put me through
Believer
Deceiver
Day in day out live my life through you
Pushed onto me what’s wrong or right
Hidden from this thing that they call life
Dear Mother
Dear Father
Every thought I’d think you’d disapprove
Curator
Dictator
Always censoring my every move
Children are seen but are not heard
Tear out everything inspired
Innocence
Torn from me without your shelter
Barred reality
I’m living blindly
Dear Mother
Dear Father
Time has frozen still what’s left to be
Hear nothing
Say nothing
Cannot face the fact I think for me
No guarantee, it’s life as is
But damn you for not giving me my chance
Dear Mother
Dear Father
You’ve clipped my wings before I learned to fly
Unspoiled
Unspoken
I’ve outgrown that fucking lullaby
Same thing I’ve always heard from you
Do as I say not as I do
Innocence
Torn from me without your shelter
Barred reality
I’m living blindly
I’m in hell without you
Cannot cope without you two
Shocked at the world that I see
Innocent victim please rescue me
Dear Mother
Dear Father
Hidden in your world you’ve made for me
I’m seething
I’m bleeding
Ripping wounds in me that never heal
Undying spite I feel for you
Living out this hell you always knew
Songwriter(s): Kirk L. Hammett, James Alan Hetfield, Lars Ulrich

“When you judge another, you do not define them, you define yourself”. Wayne Dyer

“How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours”.Wayne Dyer

Wayne Walter Dyer (born May 10, 1940) is an American self-help author and motivational speaker. He born in Detroit, Michigan, to the late Melvin Lyle and Hazel Irene Dyer and spent much of his childhood (until he was ten years old) in an orphanage on the east side of Detroit. After graduation from Denby High School Dyer served in the United States Navy from 1958 to 1962. He received his DEd degree in counseling from Wayne State University.

Dyer worked as a high school guidance counselor in Detroit and as a professor of counselor education at St. John’s University in New York City.He pursued an academic career, published in journals and established a private therapy practice. His lectures at St. John’s, which focused on positive thinking and motivational speaking techniques, attracted many students. A literary agent persuaded Dyer to document his theories in his first book called Your “Erroneous Zones”.

“When you squeeze an orange, orange juice comes out – because that’s what’s inside. When you are squeezed, what comes out is what is inside”. Wayne Dyer

“Be miserable. Or motivate yourself. Whatever has to be done, it’s always your choice”. Wayne Dyer

“Freedom means you are unobstructed in living your life as you choose. Anything less is a form of slavery”. Wayne Dyer

“Our lives are a sum total of the choices we have made”. Wayne Dyer

Dyer has been criticized by some PBS viewers for his appearances on PBS during their pledge drives and his teachings have been characterized by some of these viewers as superficial platitudes that lack rigor and have limited practical or intellectual value. In May 2010, author Stephen Mitchell, husband of New Age author Byron Katie, filed a suit against Dyer for plagiarism, accusing him of taking 200 lines of his interpretation of the Tao Te Ching for his books Living the Wisdom of the Tao and Change Your Thoughts – Change Your Life

“My beliefs are that the truth is a truth until you organize it, and then becomes a lie. I don’t think that Jesus was teaching Christianity, Jesus was teaching kindness, love, concern, and peace. What I tell people is don’t be Christian, be Christ-like. Don’t be Buddhist, be Buddha-like.” Wayne Dyer

“Religion is orthodoxy, rules and historical scriptures maintained by people over long periods of time. Generally people are raised to obey the customs and practices of that religion without question. These are customs and expectations from outside the person and do not fit my definition of spiritual.” Wayne Dyer


“DO OR DYE”

“Stop acting as if life is a rehearsal. Live this day as if it were your last. The past is over and gone. The future is not guaranteed”. Wayne Dyer

“Doing what you love is the cornerstone of having abundance in your life”. Wayne Dyer

Day & Night (2010), an animated short film created by Pixar and which was shown along with Toy Story 3 during the movie’s opening in the U.S., featured an excerpt from one of Dyer’s lectures.

“Miracles come in moments. Be ready and willing”. Wayne Dyer

Erroneous

“Sing of the Dignity of Man”‏

“We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion” Max de Pree

“Music is either sacred or secular. The sacred agrees with its dignity, and here has its greatest effect on life, an effect that remains the same through all ages and epochs. Secular music should be cheerful throughout”. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Fat man lookin’ in a blade of steel
Thin man lookin’ at his last meal
Hollow man lookin’ in a cottonfield
For dignity

Wise man lookin’ in a blade of grass
Young man lookin’ in the shadows that pass
Poor man lookin’ through painted glass
For dignity

Somebody got murdered on New Year’s Eve
Somebody said dignity was the first to leave
I went into the city, went into the town
Went into the land of the midnight sun

Searchin’ high, searchin’ low
Searchin’ everywhere I know
Askin’ the cops wherever I go
Have you seen dignity?

Blind man breakin’ out of a trance
Puts both his hands in the pockets of chance
Hopin’ to find one circumstance
Of dignity

I went to the wedding of Mary-lou
She said ?I don’t want nobody see me talkin’ to you?
Said she could get killed if she told me what she knew
About dignity

I went down where the vultures feed
I would’ve got deeper, but there wasn’t any need
Heard the tongues of angels and the tongues of men
Wasn’t any difference to me

Chilly wind sharp as a razor blade
House on fire, debts unpaid
Gonna stand at the window, gonna ask the maid
Have you seen dignity?

Drinkin’ man listens to the voice he hears
In a crowded room full of covered up mirrors
Lookin’ into the lost forgotten years
For dignity

Met Prince Phillip at the home of the blues
Said he’d give me information if his name wasn’t used
He wanted money up front, said he was abused
By dignity

Footprints runnin’ cross the silver sand
Steps goin’ down into tattoo land
I met the sons of darkness and the sons of light
In the bordertowns of despair

Got no place to fade, got no coat
I’m on the rollin’ river in a jerkin’ boat
Tryin’ to read a note somebody wrote
About dignity

Sick man lookin’ for the doctor’s cure
Lookin’ at his hands for the lines that were
And into every masterpiece of literature
for dignity

Englishman stranded in the blackheart wind
Combin’ his hair back, his future looks thin
Bites the bullet and he looks within
For dignity

Someone showed me a picture and I just laughed
Dignity never been photographed
I went into the red, went into the black
Into the valley of dry bone dreams

So many roads, so much at stake
So many dead ends, I’m at the edge of the lake
Sometimes I wonder what it’s gonna take
To find dignity

dignity (n.)
early 13c., from Old French dignite “dignity, privilege, honor,” from Latin dignitatem (nominative dignitas) “worthiness,” from dignus “worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting” from PIE *dek-no-, from root *dek- “to take, accept” .

“A creditor is worse than a slave-owner; for the master owns only your person, but a creditor owns your dignity, and can command it”. Victor Hugo

“There are two kinds of pride, both good and bad. ‘Good pride’ represents our dignity and self-respect. ‘Bad pride’ is the deadly sin of superiority that reeks of conceit and arrogance”. John C. Maxwell

“It is not wealth one asks for, but just enough to preserve one’s dignity, to work unhampered, to be generous, frank and independent”. W. Somerset Maugham

“We don’t live by just sleeping and eating. We need pride and dignity in our lives. Work gives you that”. Yoko Ono

So society just can’t let us be
Please don’t be ashamed, we are not to blame
The future’s ours to take, we will make mistakes
Scream this loud and proud, we will not back down

“Relationships based on obligation lack dignity”. Wayne Dyer

“The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances”. Aristotle

“Patriotism To The Patriots”‏

 

“It is lamentable, that to be a good patriot one must become the enemy of the rest of mankind”. Voltaire

pa•tri•ot•ism/ˈpeɪtriəˌtɪzəm or, esp. British, ˈpæ-/ Show Spelled [pey-tree-uh-tiz-uhm or, esp. British, pa-]

noun
devoted love, support, and defense of one’s country; national loyalty. Origin:
1720–30; patriot + -ism

“I have long believed that sacrifice is the pinnacle of patriotism”. Bob Riley

“Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel”. Samuel Johnson

“Patriotism demands the ability to feel shame as much as to feel pride”. Anne-Marie Slaughter

“Patriotism consists not in waving the flag, but in striving that our country shall be righteous as well as strong”. James Bryce

“They are patriotic in time of war because it is to their interest to be so, but in time of peace they follow power and the dollar wherever they may lead”. Henry A. Wallace

“The very idea of true patriotism is lost, and the term has been prostituted to the very worst of purposes. A patriot, sir! Why, patriots spring up like mushrooms! Robert Walpole

patriot (n.)
1590s, “compatriot,” from Middle French patriote (15c.) and directly from Late Latin patriota “fellow-countryman” (6c.), from Greek patriotes “fellow countryman,” from patrios “of one’s fathers,” patris “fatherland,” from pater (genitive patros) “father” (see father (n.)); with -otes, suffix expressing state or condition. Liddell & Scott write that patriotes was “applied to barbarians who had only a common [patris], [politai] being used of Greeks who had a common [polis] (or free-state).”
Meaning “loyal and disinterested supporter of one’s country” is attested from c.1600, but became an ironic term of ridicule or abuse from mid-18c. in England, so that Johnson, who at first defined it as “one whose ruling passion is the love of his country,” in his fourth edition added, “It is sometimes used for a factious disturber of the government.”

“A real patriot is the fellow who gets a parking ticket and rejoices that the system works”. Bill Vaughan

“Patriot: the person who can holler the loudest without knowing what he is hollering about”. Mark Twain

“Patriotism is a kind of religion; it is the egg from which wars are hatched”. Guy de Maupassant

“Patriotism is the religion of hell”. James Branch Cabell

“My films are always concerned with family, friendship, honor, and patriotism”. John Woo

“Patriotism is when love of your own people comes first; nationalism, when hate for people other than your own comes first”. Charles de Gaulle

“I do think the patriotic thing to do is to critique my country. How else do you make a country better but by pointing out its flaws?” Bill Maher

“Real patriotism is a willingness to challenge the government when it’s wrong”. Ron Paul

“There is a real patriotism underneath the best of my music but it is a critical, questioning and often angry patriotism”. Bruce Springsteen

“I have no sense of patriotism, but I do have a sense of community”. Chrissie Hynde

“Little Prince of the Sahara Desert”‏

“…An allegory of Saint-Exupéry’s own life—his search for childhood certainties and interior peace, his mysticism, his belief in human courage and brotherhood, and his deep love for his wife Consuelo but also an allusion to the tortured nature of their relationship.”

The Little Prince (French: Le Petit Prince; French pronunciation: [lə.pə.tiˈpʁɛ̃s]), first published in 1943, is a novella and the most famous work of the French aristocrat, writer, poet and pioneering aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1900–1944). He wrote many stories that became famous, including The Little Prince (original:Le petit prince, 1943), Night Flight (original: Vol de nuit, 1931), and Wind, Sand and Stars (original: Terre des hommes,Land of People, 1939). Saint-Exupéry did not return from a reconnaissance flight he did near Marseille, in 1944.


“The essential things in life are seen not with the eyes, but with the heart.”

“Only children know what they are looking for”.

The Little Prince is a poetic tale, with watercolour illustrations by the author, in which a pilot stranded in the desert meets a young prince fallen to Earth from a tiny asteroid. The story is philosophical and includes social criticism, remarking on the strangeness of the adult world. It was written during a dark, restless, but productive period for Saint-Exupéry after he fled to North America subsequent to the Fall of France during the Second World War, witnessed first hand by the author and captured in his memoir Flight to Arras

“I am very fond of sunsets. Come, let us go look at a sunset…”

“I should never have listened to her,” he confided to me one day, “One should never listen to the flowers. One should simply look at them and breathe their fragrance.”

After the outbreak of the Second World War Saint-Exupéry became exiled in North America. In the midst of personal upheavals and failing health he produced almost half of the writings he would be remembered for, including a tender tale of loneliness, friendship, love and loss, in the form of a young prince fallen to Earth. An earlier memoir by the author had recounted his aviation experiences in the Sahara Desert and he is thought to have drawn on those same experiences for use as plot elements in The Little Prince.

“Language is the source of misunderstandings”

In The Little Prince, its narrator, the pilot, talks of being stranded in the desert beside his crashed aircraft. This account clearly drew on Saint-Exupéry’s own experience in the Sahara, an ordeal described in detail in his 1939 memoir Wind, Sand and Stars (original French: Terre des hommes).
On December 30, 1935, at 02:45 am, after 19 hours and 44 minutes in the air, Saint-Exupéry, along with his copilot-navigator André Prévot, crashed in the Sahara desert.

They were attempting to break the speed record for a Paris-to-Saigon flight in a then-popular type of air race, called a raid, and win a prize of 150,000 francs. Their plane was a Caudron C-630 Simoun, and the crash site is thought to have been near to the Wadi Natrun valley, close to the Nile Delta.

“What makes the desert beautiful,” says the little prince, “is that somewhere it hides a well.”

Both miraculously survived the crash, only to face rapid dehydration in the intense desert heat. Their maps were primitive and ambiguous. Lost among the sand dunes with a few grapes, a thermos of coffee, a single orange, and some wine, the pair had only one day’s worth of liquid. They both began to see mirages, which were quickly followed by more vivid hallucinations. By the second and third days, they were so dehydrated that they stopped sweating altogether. Finally, on the fourth day, a Bedouin on a camel discovered them and administered a native rehydration treatment that saved Saint-Exupéry and Prévot’s lives.

The Sahara (Arabic: الصحراء الكبرى‎, aṣ-Ṣaḥrāʾ al-Kubrā , ‘the Great Desert’) is the world’s hottest desert, and the third largest desert after Antarctica and the Arctic. At over 9,400,000 square kilometres (3,600,000 sq mi), it covers most of North Africa, making it almost as large as China or the United States. The Sahara stretches from the Red Sea, including parts of the Mediterranean coasts to the Atlantic Ocean. To the south, it is delimited by the Sahel, a belt of semi-arid tropical savanna that composes the northern region of central and western Sub-Saharan Africa. Some of the sand dunes can reach 180 metres (590 ft) in height

Ooh and to believe in you.
Saharan winds to bring me wings to fly
so far away so far so high.
Saharan mystery
will charm the words
that mark the history
of wars and world
I’ll cross the night
and come to you.
You’ll take me to heights
beyond the blue,
the blue of a sweet Saharan dream.
Ooh so far across the dune
Ooh Saharan dream of you.

The Sahara covers large parts of Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Western Sahara, Sudan and Tunisia. It is one of three distinct physiographic provinces of the African massive physiographic division.


The desert landforms of the Sahara are shaped by wind or by occasional rains and include sand dunes and dune fields or sand seas (erg), stone plateaus (hamada), gravel plains (reg), dry valleys, and salt flats (shatt or chott). Unusual landforms include the Richat Structure in Mauritania.

“Then you shall judge yourself,” the king answered. “that is the most difficult thing of all. It is much more difficult to judge oneself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself rightly, then you are indeed a man of true wisdom”.

Some see the prince as a Christ figure, as “…he is described as being free of sin. He also believes in a life after death [and at] the end of the book, he returns to his star, his heaven.”However Life photojournalist John Phillips provided a direct answer to the question when he questioned the author-aviator on his inspiration for the child character. After Phillips posed the question Saint-Exupéry replied that “…one day he looked down on what he thought was a blank sheet and saw a small childlike figure.” When asked who the figure was, the author replied “I’m the Little Prince”.

Pablo Picasso Infinity

“I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it”. Pablo Picasso

Pablo Ruiz y Picasso, also known as Pablo Picasso (25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973), was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907), and Guernica (1937), a portrayal of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.

Art

“The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls”. Pablo Picasso.

“Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad”. Salvador Dali

“The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection”. Michelangelo

“No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist”. Oscar Wilde

Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a realistic manner through his childhood and adolescence. During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas.

Child

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up”. Pablo Picasso

“Free the child’s potential, and you will transform him into the world”. Maria Montessori

“Let us be men with men, and always children before God; for in His eyes we are but children. Old age itself, in presence of eternity, is but the first moment of a morning”. Joseph Joubert

“It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child”. Pablo Picasso


Creativity

“Some painters transform the sun into a yellow spot, others transform a yellow spot into the sun”. Pablo Picasso

“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep”. Dilbert, comic strip

“The chief enemy of creativity is ‘good’ sense”. Pablo Picasso

His work is often categorised into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919).

Exceptionally prolific throughout the course of his long life, Picasso achieved universal renown and immense fortune for his revolutionary artistic accomplishments, and became one of the best-known figures in 20th-century art.

Love

“Love is the greatest refreshment in life”. Pablo Picasso

“When we meet someone and fall in love, we have a sense that the whole universe is on our side. And yet if something goes wrong, there is nothing left! How is it possible for the beauty that was there only minutes before to vanish so quickly? Life moves very fast. It rushes from heaven to hell in a matter of seconds”. Paulo Coelho

“… What is hell? I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love”.
Dostoevsky, Fyodor M. (1999) [1880]. The Brothers Karamazov

If I can find the words in my mind
The words could explain but the words won’t come
If you can see what you mean to me
My words should explain but my words won’t come
And oh, how hard I try to tell you I love you
But something holds me back when I try to tell you

The Painter

“Who sees the human face correctly: the photographer, the mirror, or the painter?  Pablo Picasso

“My mother said to me, ‘If you are a soldier, you will become a general. If you are a monk, you will become the Pope.’ Instead, I was a painter, and became Picasso”. Pablo Picasso

“Paintings have a life of their own that derives from the painter’s soul”. Vincent Van Gogh

“To finish a work? To finish a picture? What nonsense! To finish it means to be through with it, to kill it, to rid it of its soul, to give it its final blow the coup de grace for the painter as well as for the picture”. Pablo Picasso

“Sexy Zadie”‏

 

Just a smile would lighten everything
Sexy Sadie she’s the latest and the greatest of them all.

 

“Women often have a great need to portray themselves as sympathetic and pleasing, but we’re also dark people with dark thoughts”. Zadie Smith

“Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never being satisfied”. Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith (born on 25 October 1975) is a British novelist, essayist and short story writer.
She has published four novels, all of which have received substantial critical praise. In 2003, she was included on Granta’s list of 20 best young authors, and was also included in the 2013 list. She joined New York University’s Creative Writing Program as a tenured professor on September 1, 2010. Smith has won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2006 and her novel White Teeth was included in Time magazine’s TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005 list.

On New Year’s Day 1975, an Englishman named Archie Jones, a 47-year-old man whose disturbed Italian wife has just walked out on him, is attempting to commit suicide by gassing himself in his car when a chance interruption causes him to change his mind.

“This is what divorce is: Taking things you no longer want from people you no longer love”.

Filled with a fresh enthusiasm for life, Archie flips a coin and then finds his way into the aftermath of a New Year’s Eve party. There he meets the much-younger Clara Bowden, a Jamaican woman whose mother, Hortense, is a devout Jehovah’s Witness. Clara had been interested in the unattractive, antisocial Ryan Topps, but their relationship falls apart after Ryan becomes a member of the Jehovah’s Witnesses. Archie and Clara are soon married and have a daughter, Irie, who grows up to be intelligent but with low self-confidence.

“He talked and talked, the kind of talking you do to stave off the inevitable physical desire. The kind of talk that only increases it”.

“…A past tense, future perfect kind of night”.

“Hysterical realism, also called “recherché postmodernism”, is a term coined in 2000 by English critic James Wood in an essay on Zadie Smith’s White Teeth to describe what he sees as a literary genre typified by a strong contrast between elaborately absurd prose, plotting, or characterization and careful, detailed investigations of real specific social phenomena.

“I think I know a thing or two about the way people love, but I don’t know anything about hatred, psychosis, cruelty. Or maybe I don’t have the guts to admit that I do”. Zadie Smith

“I wrote ‘White Teeth’ in the late nineties. I didn’t really feel trepidatious about it. It was a different time”. Zadie Smith

The Autograph Man (2002)

It follows the progress of a Jewish-Chinese Londoner named Alex-Li Tandem, who buys and sells autographs for a living and is obsessed with celebrities.
“His death is like the soft down on the back of your hand, passing unnoticed in the firmest of handshakes, though the slightest breeze makes every damn one of the tiny hairs stand on end”.


On Beauty (2005)

“The greatest lie ever told about love is that it sets you free”.

It takes its title from an essay by Elaine Scarry (On Beauty and Being Just). The story follows the lives of a mixed-race British/American family living in the United States. On Beauty addresses ethnic and cultural differences in both the USA and the UK, the nature of beauty, and the clash between liberal and conservative academic values. A short article in the Guardian has described it as a “transatlantic comic saga.”

“He was bookish, she was not; he was theoretical, she political. She called a rose a rose. He called it an accumulation of cultural and biological constructions circulating around the mutually attracting binary poles of nature/artifice”.

“I like books that don’t give you an easy ride. I like the feeling of discomfort. The sense of being implicated”. Zadie Smith

“I never attended a creative writing class in my life. I have a horror of them; most writers groups moonlight as support groups for the kind of people who think that writing is therapeutic. Writing is the exact opposite of therapy”. Zadie Smith

NW (2012)
It takes its title from the NW postcode area in North-West London, the setting of the novel. The novel is experimental and follows four different characters living in London, shifting between first and third person, stream-of-consciousness, screenplay-style dialogue and other narrative techniques in an attempt to reflect the polyphonic nature of contemporary urban life.

James Wood included the novel in his ‘Best Books of 2012′ and commented that “underneath the formal experimentation runs a steady, clear, realistic genius. Smith is a great urban realist… the best novel she has yet written.”
The Embassy of Cambodia (novella, 2013)

“Any artist who aligns themselves with a politician is making a category error because what politicians do is not on a human scale, it is on a geopolitical scale”. Zadie Smith

“Unless you consider yourself some sort of human brand, which I don’t, you have to deal with the fact that different people are going to like different aspects of your work. It’s not consistent. I am not consistent. But I feel OK with that”. Zadie Smith

I first heard “Sexy Sadie” in 1968 when my brother bought the White Album LP. The production is eerie with the echoy piano which makes the song all the more compelling. Then later when the background of the song was known (the incident with the Maharishi), it gave the song a kind of urban legend quality. When many of the Beatles’ albums were reissued a few years back, I bought the White Album. Still enjoy listening to this track. Lennon was truly a great composer. He is still truly missed by many. – BubblesK, Memphis, TN


John Lennon wrote this about the Maharishi while he was leaving India in 1968. After attending his Transcendental Meditation camp with the other Beatles, Lennon thought The Maharishi was a crock.

The song describes Lennon’s total dissatisfaction with the Maharishi. While at his retreat, it has been said that the Maharishi attempted to rape Mia Farrow. Once The Beatles learned of this, they immediately went to the Maharishi, and Lennon announced they were all leaving. The Maharishi asked why? Lennon said, “If you’re so cosmic, you’ll know why.” As originally written, some of its lyrics were considered obscene, and had to be refined. Lennon had used the Maharishi’s name, but had to change it for fear of being sued. But, Sexy Sadie is the Maharishi. Needless to say, that was the end of the Maharishi and The Beatles relationship. (Dominic – Pittsburgh, PA)

Lennon dubbed the Maharishi “sexy” after he hit on Mia Farrow. Farrow’s sister, Prudence, was also there, and her experience led Lennon to write “Dear Prudence.”

“Calling Dr. Doom”‏

“Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly, until he knows that every day is Doomsday”. - Ralph Waldo Emerson, in Society and Solitude, Work and Days


Doom is a word indicating a predetermined course of events, a Fate or Destiny, especially tragic or fatal ones.

“I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet’s voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail”. - William Faulkner, in his speech at the Nobel Prize Banquet after receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature (10 December 1950)

“Look upon this moment. Savor it! Rejoice with great gladness! Great gladness! Remember it always, for you are joined by it. You are One, under the stars. Remember it well, then… this night, this great victory. So that in the years ahead, you can say, “I was there that night, with Arthur, the King!” For it is the doom of men that they forget”. – Merlin, following the decisive British victory over the Saxons at the Battle of Badon, in Excalibur (1981), written by Rospo Pallenberg and John Boorman

“Brief and powerless is man’s life; on him and all his race the slow, sure doom falls pitiless and dark”. Bertrand Russell, in “Mysticism and Logic” in A Free Man’s Worship (1903)

“You’re all sinners. You’re all doomed to perdition. You’re all goin’ to the painful, stinkin’, scaldin’, everlastin’ tortures of a fiery hell, created by God for sinners, unless, unless, unless you repent”. – Elmer Gantry (1960), screenplay by Richard Brooks, based on the novel by Sinclair Lewis

“I don’t personally consider myself Dr. Doom. I call myself Dr. Realist, even though it’s less exciting and more boring than being called Dr. Doom. If you are consistently saying ‘the world is going to end,’ who is going to listen to you?” Nouriel Roubini

“Turn your eyes from the Torch, Over-Mind — DOOM approaches! “ – Archie Goodwin, in lines for Doctor Doom, in Fantastic Four’ # 116 : The Alien, the Ally, and Armageddon

Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional character that appears in publications by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby, the character first appeared in The Fantastic Four #5 (July 1962) wearing his trademark metal mask and green cloak.

Victor von Doom was born decades ago to a tribe of Latverian gypsies under the rule of an unnamed nobleman called the Baron. Victor’s mother was witch Cynthia Von Doom who died by Mephisto’s hand while von Doom was young. His father, Werner, was the leader of the tribe and a renowned medicine man who kept his wife’s sorceress life quiet in order to protect Victor from a similar fate. Soon after Cynthia’s death, the Baron’s wife grew incurably ill from cancer and Werner was called to the capitol to heal her. When she succumbed to illness, the Baron labeled Werner a murderer and called for his death. Werner escaped with young Victor, having realized the night before the woman would die. He goes on to die of exposure on the mountainside, cradling the boy in a final embrace and giving him his garments to keep him warm. Victor survived and, on return to the gypsy camp, discovered his mother’s occult instruments and swore revenge on the Baron. Victor grew into a headstrong and brilliant man, combining sorcery and technology to create fantastic devices to keep the Baron’s men at bay and protect the gypsies. His exploits attracted the attention of the dean of Empire State University, who sent someone to the camp. Offered the chance to study in the United States, von Doom chooses to leave his homeland and his love, Valeria, behind. Once in the United States, Victor met fellow student and future nemesis Reed Richards, who was intended to be his roommate, but von Doom disliked him and asked for another roommate. After a time, Victor constructed a machine intended to communicate with the dead. Though Richards tried to warn him about a flaw in the machine, seeing his calculations were a few decimals off, Victor continued on with disastrous results. The machine violently failed and the resulting explosion seemingly severely damaged his face. It is later revealed that Ben Grimm, a friend of Richards who despised Victor for his superior attitude, tampered with the machine. He would later blame himself for Doctor Doom ‘s eventual rise to power, but never revealed this information to anyone. Expelled after the accident, Victor traveled the world until he collapsed on a Tibetan mountainside. Rescued by a clan of monks, Victor quickly mastered the monks’ disciplines as well as the monks themselves. Victor then forged himself a suit of armor, complete with a scowling mask, and took the name Doctor Doom. As Doctor Doom, he would go on to menace those he felt responsible for his accident—primarily, Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four. He succeeded in taking over Latveria, taking an interest in the welfare of the Roma.

Jack Kirby modeled Doctor Doom after Death, with the armor standing in for that character’s skeleton: “It was the reason for the armor and the hood. Death is connected with armor and the inhuman-like steel. Death is something without mercy, and human flesh contains that mercy.”

Kirby further described Doctor Doom as being “paranoid”, wrecked by his twisted face and wanting the whole world to be like him: “Doctor Doom is an evil person, but he’s not always been evil. He was [respected]…but through a flaw in his own character, he was a perfectionist.”

Doctor Doom: Bereft of my technology… mystic armor damaged… offensive and defensive capabilities minimal. Enemy forces… [a horde of demons closes in] substantial. It matters not. Even cornered, to my last breath I remain who and what I am. I will not hide, nor tremble, nor beg. Let them come and reckon with fury that is DOOM defiant. Here I stand, hell-horde! Unbowed! But understand: If it is my destiny that I should perish this day, I shall not go down easily… and I shall NOT go down ALONE.
Demons: RIP its SKIN. Wear it for HIDE. Its EYES for me. Tear its FLESH from its BONES.
Doctor Doom: Yes, come, and let us make an end of it — there is DOOM enough for ALL! – Michael Straczynski (June 2006), “The Hammer Falls (Part 2)”, Fantastic Four (537)

Described as “iconic”, Doctor Doom is one of the most well-received supervillains of the Marvel universe, as well as one of the most recurring; in his constant battles with heroes and other villains, Doctor Doom has appeared more times than any other villain. The comics site Panels of Awesome ranked Doctor Doom as the number one villain in their listing of the top ten villains in comics; Wizard Magazine went a step further by declaring Doctor Doom the fourth greatest villain of all time.

A ride called Doctor Doom’s Fearfall is located at Islands of Adventure in the Universal Orlando Resort.

“Modern science says: ‘The sun is the past, the earth is the present, the moon is the future.’ From an incandescent mass we have originated, and into a frozen mass we shall turn. Merciless is the law of nature, and rapidly and irresistibly we are drawn to our doom”. Nikola Tesla

“Being an environmentalist isn’t all about doom and gloom”. David Suzuki

Doom metal is an extreme form of heavy metal music that typically uses slower tempos, low-tuned guitars and a much “thicker” or “heavier” sound than other metal genres. Both the music and the lyrics intend to evoke a sense of despair, dread, and impending doom.

The genre is strongly influenced by the early work of Black Sabbath, who formed a prototype for doom metal with songs such as “Black Sabbath”, “Electric Funeral” and “Into the Void”. During the first half of the 1980s, a number of bands from England (Pagan Altar, Witchfinder General), the United States (Pentagram, Saint Vitus) and Sweden (Candlemass, Count Raven) defined doom metal as a distinct genre.

Lyrics in doom metal play a key role. Often, they are pessimistic and include themes such as: suffering, depression, fear, grief, dread, death and anger. While some bands write lyrics in introspective and personal ways, others convey their themes using symbolism – which may be inspired by literature.

meganelizabethmorales

You're insane? We're all insane! Bwahahahaha!

Storiform.com

Writing Popular Fiction

The Ink Stain

Hi everyone! This is my blog, and this is where I post all of my stories. Writing is my favorite thing to do, and I love nothing more than this. I would appreciate it if you took the time to read my stories! If you like the blog, please share it with more people. Thank you!

jumiss

jumiss ebay

Life Is a Damn Circus

...And We Are The Circus Acts

On The Heath

World's Worst Writer Winner!!!

ultimatemindsettoday

A great WordPress.com site

UP!::urban po'E.Tree(s)

by po'E.T. and the colors of pi

Humanity777's Blog

The Church of Christ

alteredhistories

A multi-crossover RPF series

Why It Matters

Words & Music for Liquor, Lust & Primer Gray Camaros

Cassandra Rose Arthur Essays

A Collection of Political/Philosohpical Essays, Poetry and Journal Entries written from 2006 - Present

Alex and Cruz

A comic about the urban life of a Dragon and a Cheetah

Dave's Corner of the Universe

Where strange fact and stranger fiction collide

Culturalia

Un Blog sobre la literatura, el teatro, el cine, la televisión, la historia...

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 122 other followers