“Express Polar-oids”‏

“Rising sea levels, severe draughts, the melting of the polar caps, the more frequent and devastating natural disasters all raise demand for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief”. Leon Panetta

polar (adj.)
1550s, from Middle French polaire (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin polaris “of or pertaining to the poles,” from Latin polus “an end of an axis” (see pole (n.2)). Meaning “directly opposite in character or tendency” is attested from 1832. Polar bear first recorded 1781.

In the bright shop window sits the polar bear
Makes the children’s eyes light up to see him there
Amongst the tinsel he gives everyone a smile
To see him as you’d see a star
Love him from where you are
He’s not for, not for, not for sale
Past an open window walks the pretty girl
Does she see me at her feet it’s hard to tell
But if I ask her she might turn her smile away
To see her as I’d see a star
Love her from where you are
She’s not for, not for, not for sale
I guess I’ll learn to look
Without a grasping hand
Minor contentment wears a smile
I love her from where I lie
He’s not for, not for, not for sale
Not for sale

“Well, my son really loves wildlife. And everytime he draws a polar bear I want to tell him there probably won’t any by the time… he’s my age. That’s kinda hard to deal with”. Thom Yorke

“The Polar Express is about faith, and the power of imagination to sustain faith. It’s also about the desire to reside in a world where magic can happen, the kind of world we all believed in as children, but one that disappears as we grow older”. Chris Van Allsburg

The Polar Express is a 1985 children’s book (ISBN 0-86264-143-8) written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg, a former professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. The book is now widely considered to be a classic Christmas story for young children. It was praised for its detailed illustrations and calm, relaxing storyline. In 1986, it was awarded the Caldecott Medal for children’s literature

As the story starts off, a young boy, who used to adore Christmas, hears a train whistle roar. To his astonishment, he finds the train is waiting for him. He sees a conductor who then proceeds to look up at his window. He runs downstairs and goes outside. The conductor explains the train is called the Polar Express, and is journeying to the North Pole. The boy then boards the train, which is filled with chocolate and candy, as well as many other children in their pajamas….

“At one time, most of my friends could hear the bell, but as years passed, it fell silent for all of them. Even Sarah found one Christmas that she could no longer hear its sweet sound. Though I’ve grown old, the bell still rings for me, as it does for all who truly believe”. The End

There’s something known as the Uncanny Valley where things look a little too real and you’re not quite sure what you’re looking at. It becomes weird like it did in ‘The Polar Express,’ where the eyes seem so realistic, and yet you know it’s animated”. Nolan North

“The days, months, and years eventually reveal, like a Polaroid, a clear picture of how significant events and decisions ultimately shape our lives”. Hoda Kotb

Instant film is a type of photographic film invented by Agfa, but first introduced by Polaroid to be used in an instant camera (and, with accessory hardware, with many professional film cameras). The film contains the chemicals needed for developing and fixing the photo, and the instant camera exposes and initiates the developing process after a photograph has been taken.

In earlier Polaroid instant cameras the film is pulled through rollers which breaks open a pod containing a reagent that is spread between the exposed negative and receiving positive sheet. This film sandwich develops for a predetermined time, depending on film type and ambient temperature, after which the positive sheet is peeled away from the negative to reveal the developed photo.

In 1972, Polaroid introduced integral film, which incorporated timing and receiving layers to automatically develop and fix the photo without any intervention from the photographer.

“I still love taking pictures with Polaroid film. For me, it offers the most beautiful way of capturing reality and transferring it onto a flat piece of paper”. Helena Christensen

Maripol is an artist, film producer, fashion designer and stylist who has had an influence on the looks of many influential artists, including Grace Jones, Deborah Harry and Madonna. Maripol is also a Polaroid artist photographer who has exhibited her photos in art galleries all over the world. Her photographic work is being collected by museums.

“At the beginning, Edo was a photographer, and I was more of a talent scout and doing styling and modelling. Then all of a sudden, in 1977, he gave me a Polaroid camera, and I discovered that instead of having to go to a lab and develop the film, I could just take a click and get a picture! It was genius, and I was very good at manipulating it”. Maripol

She has also worked as a film producer, most notably on the post-production of Downtown 81, a film starring artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and featuring Blondie lead singer Deborah Harry, and with musical interludes by many New York No Wave bands. The movie, directed by then partner Edo Bertoglio and written and produced by Glenn O’Brien, was filmed in 1980-81 as New York Beat. However, it was not until the late 1990s that the film was edited and released (as).

Working Girl is a 1988 film about a spunky Wall Street secretary whose business idea is stolen by her boss, but when her boss is injured, she seizes an opportunity to steal it back by pretending she has her boss’s job. Directed by Mike Nichols. Written by Kevin Wade.

Tess McGill: Why did you say you weren’t you last night?
Jack Trainer: Because I knew it would happen. All Mergers and Acquisitions. No lust and tequila.
Tess McGill: That was… I mean that just happened, okay? I want to make it clear, um… What did happen, exactly?
Jack Trainer: The earth moved. The angels wept. The Polaroids are, are, uh… [gropes about in his coat pockets] are in my other coat. [grins] Nothing happened. Nothing happened!
Tess McGill: I woke up in my underwear.
Jack Trainer: I’ll bet you look nice.

“Polaroid by its nature makes you frugal. You walk around with maybe two packs of film in your pocket. You have 20 shots, so each shot is a world”. Patti Smith

“I’m definitely a Polaroid camera girl. For me, what I’m really excited about is bringing back the artistry and the nature of Polaroid”. Lady Gaga

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