“Tapestry Close-up”

“The mind is like a richly woven tapestry in which the colors are distilled from the experiences of the senses, and the design drawn from the convolutions of the intellect”. Carson McCullers

“Carole King’s second album, ‘Tapestry,’ has fulfilled the promise of her first and confirmed the fact that she is one of the most creative figures in all of pop music. It is an album of surpassing personal-intimacy and musical accomplishment and a work infused with a sense of artistic purpose. It is also easy to listen to and easy to enjoy”. Jon Landau

First attested in English in 1467, the word tapestry derives from Old French tapisserie, from tapisser, meaning “to cover with heavy fabric, to carpet”, in turn from tapis, “heavy fabric”, via Latin tapes (GEN tapetis), which is the latinisation of the Greek τάπης (tapēs; GEN τάπητος, tapētos), “carpet, rug”.
Tapestries have been used since at least Hellenistic times.

Samples of Greek tapestry have been found preserved in the desert of Tarim Basin dating from the 3rd century BC. It reached a new stage in Europe in the early 14th century AD. The first wave of production originated in Germany and Switzerland. Over time, the craft expanded to France and the Netherlands. The basic tools have remained much the same.

Tapestry is a form of textile art, traditionally woven on a vertical loom. However, it can also be woven on a floor loom as well. It is composed of two sets of interlaced threads, those running parallel to the length (called the warp) and those parallel to the width (called the weft); the warp threads are set up under tension on a loom, and the weft thread is passed back and forth across part or all of the warps.In the Middle Ages and renaissance, a rich tapestry panel woven with symbolic emblems, mottoes, or coats of arms called a baldachin, canopy of state or cloth of state was hung behind and over a throne as a symbol of authority.


The iconography of most Western tapestries goes back to written sources, the Bible and Ovid’s Metamorphoses being two popular choices. Apart from the religious and mythological images, hunting scenes are the subject of many tapestries produced for indoor decoration.

The term tapestry is also used to describe weft-faced textiles

 Chuck Close

Charles Thomas “Chuck” Close (born July 5, 1940) is an American painter and photographer who achieved fame as a photorealist, through his massive-scale portraits. Close had been known for his skillful brushwork as a graduate student at Yale University. There, he emulated Willem de Kooning and seemed “destined to become a third-generation abstract expressionist, although with a dash of Pop iconoclasm”.

After a brief experiment with figurative constructions, Close began copying black-and-white photographs of a female nude in colour on to canvas.He made a choice in 1967 to make art hard for himself and force a personal artistic breakthrough by abandoning the paintbrush.

“”I threw away my tools, I chose to do things I had no facility with. The choice not to do something is in a funny way more positive than the choice to do something. If you impose a limit to not do something you’ve done before, it will push you to where you’ve never gone before.”

One photo of Philip Glass was included in his resulting black and white series in 1969, redone with water colors in 1977, again redone with stamp pad and fingerprints in 1978, and also done as gray handmade paper in 1982.

Close suffers from prosopagnosia, also known as face blindness, in which he is unable to recognize faces. By painting portraits, he is better able to recognize and remember faces.

“I was not conscious of making a decision to paint portraits because I have difficulty recognizing faces. That occurred to me twenty years after the fact when I looked at why I was still painting portraits, why that still had urgency for me. I began to realize that it has sustained me for so long because I have difficulty in recognizing faces.”

Since 2012, Magnolia Editions has published an ongoing series of archival watercolor prints by Close which use the artist’s grid format and the precision afforded by contemporary digital printers to layer water-based pigment on Hahnemuhle rag papersuch that the native behavior of watercolor is manifested in each print: “The edges of each pixel bleed with cyan, magenta, and yellow, creating a kind of three-dimensional fog effect behind the intended color swatches.”

“I’ve had two great collaborators in the God knows how many years I’ve been making prints. One was the late Joe Wilfer, who was called the ‘prince of pulp’’ … and now I’m working with Don Farnsworth in Oakland at…Magnolia Editions: I do the watercolor prints with him, I do the tapestries with him. These are the most important collaborations of my life as an artist.”

Tapestry of Delights

The comprehensive guide to British music of the Beat, R and B, Psychedelic and Progressive, eras 1963 – 1976. This is a completely revised and updated version of a book originally published in 1995, when it was nominated as the 4th Best Music Book of ’95 by Record Collector, and described as an “impressive 600 page job, that includes more across the board info than most rock encyclopedias” by “Q Magazine”. Since then many entries have been rewritten, more have been added, and all have been updated to include relevant releases since 1995. The book covers British rock and pop between 1963-76. It includes full discographies (albums, EPs, singles and retrospectives) for almost all entries as well as personnel details, biographical information, in most cases some comment about the music, compilation listings and an up-to-date rarity scale. A wide range of musical genres are covered: mainstream rock and pop, Merseybeat, R and B, folk, folk-rock, jazz-rock, blues-rock, psychedelia, freakbeat, glam-rock, progressive rock, including many artists who didn’t attract the publicity they deserved at the time, and many who’ve never appeared in music encyclopedias before.

“The only problem I have with Vernon’s bible is the small fortune in new music it has cost me, but considering some of the great artists I’ve discovered through this fantastic compendium, I think he can be forgiven. The short descriptions of the albums are normally enough to give a general impression of what to expect, and when I then get the album myself, I generally tend to agree with his assessment of it. There is a lot of material on many bands I’m not interested in, but that goes with the territory. Important is that if I pick up any compilation of 60s or 70 artists, I can probably find information on nearly every band on it, no matter how obscure”. Michael

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